Overdosing your child is dangerous, but underdosing your child may not break the child's fever. These fever reducers usually come with a dosing cup or syringe. Your 4 steps when giving your child any medication should be the following:

Over-The-Counter Medications for Children Ages 2 to 5 ~ Fever Reducers

In my previous article, I wrote that there is such a thing as a “big” three-year-old and a “small” three-year-old. I also stated that some medications may be dosed based on the weight of your child. Both fever reducers that exist on the market at this time are dosed based on your child’s weight.

I am writing this article to aid parents and guardians in dosing their child’s fever-reducing medications. Let me repeat that there are only two fever reducers available on the market for your 2 to 5 year old child. Both acetaminophen and ibuprofen are available over-the-counter. You may think, “That’s not true, there’s Children’s Advil, Tylenol, Children’s Motrin, PediaCare Fever Reducer, PediaCare IB, Little Fevers, etc.” The products I just named have either acetaminophen or ibuprofen as the active ingredient. I will repeat once again, that there are only two fever-reducing medications for your 2 to 5 year old child. Just remember to look at the active ingredients on the box or bottle to see what is contained in each product.

Multi-symptom cold and flu remedies may also contain acetaminophen or ibuprofen as an. I must stress the importance of reading the active ingredients listed on your children’s medications to make sure that you are not overdosing your child. Please refer to my article entitled Cough, Cold and Flu Remedies You Should Have In Your Home to review the reasons to avoid giving your child a multi-symptom medications.

Overdosing your child is dangerous, but underdosing your child may not break the child’s fever. These fever reducers usually come with a dosing cup or syringe. Your 4 steps when giving your child any medication should be the following:

1. Look at the directions on the product.

2. Measure out the dose.

3. Make sure the dose on the product equals the amount you measured

4. Give the child the correct dose.

Make sure you double-check the dose you are giving before measuring out the medication, and after you have measured the dose. If you get interrupted (phone call, tending to another child, etc.) between reading the directions and measuring the medication, start the steps over again.

I hope this information is useful to you and your family. Please feel free to comment on what else you would like me to post for you.

~Dr. Dee

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